The Arizona Registry of Contractors Changes the Rules

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Arizona contractor advertising laws have been changed.

Herny Staggs, RRO

September 17, 2021


If you are a contractor in Arizona, we may have good news. Every day you guys are out there advertising your business. Did you know you might be doing it wrong?  The law used to be that you had to have your ROC license number included in everything. That includes your truck signs and business cards. And anything else you put your company name on becomes an advertisement. 

Times are changing however and now you are no longer going to be required to include your ROC license number on your truck signs, on the radio, internet, or in billboard adverting. Now, concerning your web site. If you advertise your website online or on a billboard. You don't have to include your ROC number. However, your ROC number does still need to be displayed on your website.

  • The advertisement complies with all other requirements listed under A.R.S. § 32-1124 and A.A.C. R4-9-109;

  • The provided website address links directly to the licensee’s home page; and

  • The licensee’s name and ROC license number:

    • Appears directly on the licensee’s home page;

    • Is clearly visible, and is not hidden behind graphics, photos, or other obstructions;

    • Is in an appropriately sized font; and

    • Is not in the website’s footer.POther places you still need to include your ROC number are on your letterheads, proposals, and contracts. {retty much anything else that you use to communicate with your client. 

After September 29th, 2021 the new law says that a contractor does not have to include their ROC number on certain advertisements. Such as on trucks, the radio, online, or billboard advertising. As long as your ROC is "Prominately displayed" on the contractor's website.

 

Prominently displayed on the website means:

 

  • The advertisement complies with all other requirements listed under A.R.S. § 32-1124 and A.A.C. R4-9-109;

  • The provided website address links directly to the licensee’s home page; and

  • The licensee’s name and ROC license number:

    • Appears directly on the licensee’s home page;

    • Is clearly visible, and is not hidden behind graphics, photos, or other obstructions;

    • Is in an appropriately sized font; and

    • Is not in the website’s footer.

The "handyman" exemption stays in place. If you're not sure what that means? In Arizona, you can be exempt from having a ROC license. Under various conditions, such as doing work on your own property. Any handyman doing work under one thousand dollars could be exempt. You can read more about the Handyman exemption here

If you want to know more about who the ROC is click here. And remember owner, it's up to you to do your due diligence before hiring any contractor. This link to this article can help you vet a contractor thoroughly.

Folks, this author is not an attorney. If you need legal advice ask your lawyer and always do your own homework. Knowledge is power.

 

Henry Staggs, RRO

(480) 265-1613

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